Posts Tagged ‘Nottingham castle’

Sunday 21 December 1264: cash and castles

Sunday, December 21st, 2014

The court spent the week at Worcester, where it covered its expenses by borrowing £40 from the bishop. The bailiffs of Worcester contributed £15 from the farm of the town. Hugh Despenser, the justiciar, lent another £40, which was paid to John de Grey, who had been keeper of Nottingham castle. This was an indicator of another success for the government. John de Grey had been holding the castle for the royalists, but had now made peace. In return, the government ordered William Marshal to hand back Grey’s lands in Northamptonshire, which Marshal had been occupying.

The city of Gloucester in the early fourteenth century. From BL Royal 13 A III, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s  Historia Regum Britanniae.

The city of Gloucester in the early fourteenth century. From BL Royal 13 A III, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia Regum Britanniae.

The government made further attempts to assert its control over key strongholds, committing Nottingham castle to Hugh Despenser, the justiciar, Gloucester castle to Simon de Montfort junior, Bridgnorth and Shrewsbury castles to Ralph Basset of Drayton, and Hereford castle to Peter de Montfort. The problem would be to convince the royalists who still held several castles to hand them over. Lord Edward, the king’s son, was said to have committed the castle and town of Bristol to Simon de Montfort senior, and to have received Ludgershall, in Wiltshire; as Edward was Simon’s prisoner, he may not have had much choice in this exchange. On the other hand, Edward’s captivity may not have been too unpleasant; he was sent 50 tuns of wine from the king’s wines in Nottingham castle. Although the marchers agreed to make peace, plundering and disorder continued. The marcher leaders were offered safe conduct to go to Kenilworth to meet lord Edward, and again ordered to release prisoners they had taken at Northampton. (CPR 1258-66, 394-7, 475; Close Rolls 1264-68, 83-4; CLR 1260-67, 151, 154; CFR 1264-65, 630-7; Foedera, I, I, 449)

Preparations began for the king to celebrate Christmas at Evesham. The sheriffs of London were to arrange for the transport of supplies for the king’s wardrobe, such as wax, robes, napkins and towels. (CLR 1260-67, 153)