Posts Tagged ‘Havering’

Henry III’s Fine Rolls Blog Monday 22 January to Saturday 27 January 1257

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Perspicacious readers will already have appreciated  why this week’s blog needs to run  from Monday not Sunday. Last week’s blog mistakenly followed the calendar for 2012 not 1257 and so ran from Sunday 15 January to Saturday 21 January instead of Sunday 14 January to Saturday 20 January. In this blog we are now back on the true 1257 course.

Henry III began this week at Westminster and then, between 24 and 27 January  moved to Windsor.  Once there, he took steps to see the five chaplains  serving the castle’s chapels and the four serjeants in the garrison received their pay.

The fine rolls show the raising of the gold treasure in full swing. In these six days no less than eleven men offered the king half a mark of gold apiece for exemption from knighthood.  How effectively the sheriffs were putting pressure throughout the country on men to assume the title  or (which was preferable)  pay not to do so, is shown by the fact that these fines came from a wide sweep of counties:  Devon, Gloucestershire, Wiltshire,   Hampshire, Sussex,  Cambridgeshire,   Suffolk, Leicestershire,  Rutland, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire.  The gold was intended to  finance an expedition to Sicily, and this week Henry, the brother of the king of Castile, who was being mooted as the possible commander of the army, was allowed to hunt at the royal manor of Havering in Essex.

Other fines of gold came from Robert of Canterbury for a die in the king’s mint at Canterbury and from  Walter de la More of Buckinghamshire to  have a pardon for a homicide. This second concession (no.383 in the Calendar)  was made at the instance of Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.  (For the entry see twenty items down in the image of the membrane:  Montfort also secured in this week a charter from the king allowing him to set up a new park at his manor of Shipley in Northumberland.  Since there is no reference to a fine for this on the fine rolls, he got the concession free of charge. These favours are useful reminders of how far Montfort was back on good terms with the king before the revolution of 1258.  He was not at court this week,  but his close associate (although no relation),  Peter de Montfort,  a member of the king’s council, witnesses the Shipley charter  and it was probably  through Peter that the concessions were obtained. Other witnesses were Peter of Savoy, Guy de Lusignan and William de Valence which shows how very prominent the king’s foreign relatives were at court. In 1258 that court was to break apart.

One small point of chancery practice or mispractice. No 380 in the Calendar (seventeen items down in the image) is an interesting example of an  entry being enrolled late and out of sequence.  It is a concession to Philip Basset, witnessed at Windsor on 7 November 1256. Note also the smaller hand and lighter ink from the entries before and after.  This hand and ink, however, is not found in the marginal annotation to the entry, which looks the same as those to the other entries,  a  sure sign these marginalia were done later all at the same time.  I  assume, incidentally,  that when the immediately following entry (no.381) is said to be ‘witnessed as above’, that refers back to the 27 January of entry no.375 not 7 November of  380.

King Henry III’s Fine Roll Blog

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Easter in this year, 2011, is unusually late, falling on 24 April.  There were in fact only two years in the  reign of Henry III when Easter was on 24  April, and in which, therefore,  the whole calendar was exactly the same as it is in 2011,  with each day of the month falling on the same day of the week.   These years were 1261 and 1272. 1272 was, of course, the last year of Henry’s reign and he did not reach its end, dying on 16 November.  I have decided therefore, in starting Henry III’s fine rolls blog, to take the year 1261, a very dramatic one in which he threw off the controls imposed on him by the Provisions of Oxford in 1258.

Between Sunday 27 March and Saturday 3 April, Henry III was at the Tower of London, a place where normally he would never live, much preferring his palace at Westminster.  Having at the start of the year, escaped from the ruling council imposed in 1258 and recovered control over his seal, he had been based at the Tower since February, the great fortress providing  a secure base from which he could defy the gathering opposition to his demarche. Letters Henry wrote in this week showed his anxieties. He cautioned his Poitevin half brother, William de Valence, expelled in 1258, against returning to England, doubtless fearing the storm it would provoke, and also expressed his hope that the arbitration of the king of France might settle his quarrels with Simon de Montfort. The  fine rolls of this week, however, suggest a different picture, that of business as usual.  Henry (or his ministers) issued orders about the running of two royal manors, Brill in Oxfordshire and Havering in Essex. The money arising from Brill  was to be sent to the Exchequer at Westminster, so clearly this was still seen as a safe place for the king’s money, even if he himself was at the Tower.   There were also twenty individuals who bought writs from the chancery to progress the legal actions in which they were involved. Clearly they were perfectly prepared to enter the Tower of London to get these.